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Aloe ferox

Family: Asphodelaceae (Aloe family)

Common names: Bitter Aloe (E); umHlaba (Z); Bitteraalwyn, Tapaalwyn (A);

Native to: Southern Africa
Shrub, Succulent
A single-stemmed succulent plant with bright orange-red flowers.

Aloe ferox

EVERGREEN

FULL SUN

FROST HARDY

LOW WATER REQUIREMENTS

FAST GROWER

ATTRACTS BIRDS

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

2m x 1m

MAXIMUM SIZE:

5m (height)
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D
FRUITING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Aloe ferox

DESCRIPTION

An attractive, single-stemmed aloe with thick rosettes of thorny succulent leaves and tall stunning spikes of tubular orange-red flowers that are carried on showy flowerheads.

NATURAL HABITAT & DISTRIBUTION
Occurs in a variety of habitats from mountain slopes, rocky places and flat open areas.
WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
Aloe ferox is rich in nectar and attracts bees, sunbirds, mousebirds and barbets.
The dry leaves on the lower parts of the stem often provide homes for small insects. These in turn, attract insectivorous birds and lizards who feast on them.
WATER REQUIREMENTS
This aloe species is remarkably adapted to tolerate and flourish in extremely dry areas of the Karoo as well as wetter climates in the Eastern Cape, so it is best to grow it in a garden low-moderate water application.
MAINTENANCE
Low maintenance.
LANDSCAPING USES
A magnificent focal plant to add to a rockery.
This makes an attractive plant for a water-wise garden.
GARDEN THEMES
Bushveld, Country, Formal, Grassland, Rockery, Succulent
FLOWERS
The inflorescence is branched into 5-12 erect racemes. The flowers are usually bright orange-red, but can also be found in bright red, yellow, and white forms.
FOLIAGE
The leaves are broad, dull green to grey-green and turn red from the tips in drought conditions. They form the typical aloe rosette form, with dry leaves persistent on the lower parts of the stem.
FRUIT
SPINES
The leaves bear dark brown spines along their edges and sometimes on their upper and lower surface of the leaves.

4 Responses

  1. Hi William

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Contact an aloe breeder in your area who should be able to give you these details.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. Hi Stephen

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The key with transplanting aloes is to allow the roots to dry out before replanting. You’ll have to protect the foliage during transportation as the leaves break easily.

    You may require a permit to move aloes between provinces, so contact the Aloe council of South Africa (http://www.aloesa.co.za/index.html) to find out more.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  3. Hi, I want to transplant aloes from the Karoo to our Jhb garden; what is the best method for success?

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