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Buddleja saligna

Family: LOGANIACEAE (Strychnos family)

Common names: False Olive (E); umNceba (Z); Witolienhout (A);

Native to: Southern Africa
Shrub, Tree

Buddleja saligna

EVERGREEN

FULL SUN

FROST HARDY

MEDIUM WATER REQUIREMENTS

FAST GROWER

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

4m x 3m
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D
FRUITING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Buddleja saligna

DESCRIPTION

A very hardy, evergreen and drought-resistant shrub or small tree. The bark is creamy-brown to dark brown and longitudinally furrowed. The linear leaves are medium to dark green and smooth above with the underside pale and with conspicuous veins. It bears masses of honey-scented scented, white or cream flowers. The fruit is an ovoid capsule about 2mm long, pale yellowish-brown when mature.

WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
The mass of flowers attract bees, butterflies and other useful insects. These will, in turn, attract insectivorous birds.
WATER REQUIREMENTS
Water moderately
MAINTENANCE
Low maintenance
LANDSCAPING USES
GARDEN THEMES
Bushveld, Country, Forest, Formal, French, Mediterranean, Oriental, Woodland
FLOWERS
FOLIAGE
BARK

34 Responses

  1. Hi Imelda

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, Buddleja saligna will be able to grow in Underberg. It is in fact, quite frequently found growing naturally in the area.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. Hi there

    Will this plant be able to grow in Underberg? It’s very cold in winter and rains a lot in summer.

  3. Hi Chiara

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    As far as I’m aware, Buddleja saligna is not toxic to pets. Cats seem to enjoy the rough bark for sharpening their claws and will climb up a larger tree.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  4. Hi Theresa

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Both Buddleja saligna and Dais cotinifolia are fantastic trees that can grow next to each other. Remember to allow adequate spacing between them to avoid root competition and to allow space for their foliage crowns to show off their true beauty. I’d recommend a planting distance of at least 6m.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  5. Hi Mark

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The growth of Buddleja salinga tends to be stunted when grown in a pot. Perhaps also consider smaller-growing alternatives such as:
    – Ilex mitis (Cape holly)
    – Warburgia Salutaris (Pepper-Bark Tree)
    – Diospyros whyteana (Bladdernut)

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  6. I have a paved space of approximately 1 m between my swimming pool. and perimeter wall. I am looking to plant a quick growing plant / trees as a screen. I currently have 5 cement pots about 1m x 075 m that I would want to use. Would Buddleja saligna be suitable ? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    Thanking you in advance

  7. Hi Dennis

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, Buddleja saligna will work as a windbreak.

    It’s best to plant them 1m apart to get a dense hedge.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  8. Hi. I need to plant a windbreak for our storage facility. Preferably I want to shape it like a hedge not higher than 2m. It was recommended to use Leylandii cypress, but difficult to get in Bloemfontein.
    Another recommendation was Buddleja saligna. As the Buddleja is available and a hardy plant, would you recommend us using it. If so what spacing would be the best?

  9. Hi Michelle

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Buddleja saligna is generally very hardy and grows in many conditions. Perhaps check with your local nursery as they may have more detailed knowledge specific to your conditions.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  10. Hi Santie

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Buddleja saligna may work as a windbreak if planted 3m apart. There are, however other species you may also consider:

    – Brachylaena discolor (Silver oak)
    – Tarchonanthus camphoratus (Camphor bush)
    – Harpephyllum caffrum (Wild plum)
    – Pittosporum viridiflorum (Cheesewood)

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  11. Hi Ignatius

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    You should always aim to plant at the same depth that your trees are in their bags.

    I recommend using an organic fertiliser as there is minimal risk in altering soil properties. Remember to also apply a generous proportion of compost to your soil and to apply mulch around the trees.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  12. Hello
    We have cut down a 30m Tipuana that caused havoc with walls and driveway. I have purchased two false olives to
    allow for fast growth and screening along the fence plan to grow to 4m? which will be sufficient Please advise planting depth and type of fertilizer for initial and around to use. The area is in full sun .

  13. Hi there. Can you use / plant the false olive trees as windbreaks in the Swellendam(Southern Cape) area ?
    If yes……how far apart from each other?

  14. Hi Christine

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Buddleja salinga is generally hardy and tolerant of a variety of climatic conditions. However, a garden situation may sometimes have factors that can stress the plant. For example, I saw one instance where some trees had been over-watered for a prolonged period. This lead to a fungal infection and an attack by scale-like insects.

    They are also a host plant to caterpillar species so some leaves may have signs of being eaten. Note that this is for a short period and barely noticeable as the caterpillars are few in number.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  15. Hi Jorrie

    Thanks for visting Plantbook.

    Yes, you may plant Buddleja saligna close to paving but allow at least 2-3m from the edge to provide space for the plant to grow.

    The fruit is a small brown capsule that develops in the dead flowers and contains several minute seeds.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  16. Hi Glenice,

    Can I plant it next to paving or street ? Will the root system effect it? Where can I see how does the seeds look like? Is it small? Does the plant produce friut?

  17. Hi Al

    The Buddleja saligna plant starts flowering from about 4 years of age.

    Flowering season is throughout summer from September through to April.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  18. Hi Helmine

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, Buddleja saligna can be planted in a cement pot. Make sure your pot is at least 1m wide and 1m high to give your tree adequate room to grow a healthy root system.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  19. Hi Aaron

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, Buddleja saligna will thrive in your area.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  20. Hi Liz

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Buddleja saligna (False Olive) are usually fuss-free plants that can withstand Gauteng winters. I’ve noticed that they do not like being over-watered, so rather allow more days between your watering schedule.

    They don’t need any special protecting in winter, but I’d advise you to mulch the soil.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  21. Hi, I planted two Falso Olives about a year ago. One is doing very well but the other seems to be struggling a bit. It gets regular water, compost and organic fertilizer, full sun etc. Any care tips for a young plant and will it be frost resistant in winter? Thanks

  22. Hi Christine

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    As a hedge, you’d need to give the plant at least 1.5m from the wall as the roots will still require room to grow.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  23. Hi Nic

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The roots are not considered aggressive. However, their depth and characteristics will depend on the soil conditions and your gardening practices.

    As a guide, do not plant the tree less than 3m from any structure as the roots can spread up to 10m and will vary in depth from 10mm to 4m.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  24. Hi Nomcebo

    Yes, Buddleja saligna can provide shade to a single storey house. When planting, give it at least 3m from the house to give the roots space to grow.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  25. you mention that it does not have an aggressive root system hoe deep do the roots grow and to what diameter do they spread to

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