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Clivia miniata

Family: Amaryllidaceaea (Amaryllis family)

Common names: Bush Lily, Fire Lily (E); Umayime (Z); Boslelie (A);

Native to: Southern Africa
Bulb, Groundcover, Perennial
An evergreen perennial which bears stuning orange or yellow flowers to herald the beginning of spring.

Clivia miniata

EVERGREEN

SEMI-SHADE

SHADE

SEMI FROST HARDY

MEDIUM WATER REQUIREMENTS

MEDIUM GROWER

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

0.45m x 0.6m
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Clivia miniata

DESCRIPTION

Clivia is a fast-growing, evergreen perennial that forms a neat clump of strappy leaves. The orange or yellow flowers are long-lasting and signal the end of winter.  The plant will tolerate moderate frost, but if affected will quickly recover in summer.

After the flowering season, Clivia bears attractive, bright red berries which if left to ripen, drop to release seeds.

I’ve noticed that clivias grown in full shade flower later in spring than those which receive a little sun.

NATURAL HABITAT & DISTRIBUTION
Damp woodlands
WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
Clivias attract a host of insects to the garden.
WATER REQUIREMENTS
Water moderately in summer. Avoid having damp conditions in winter and reduce the watering to just once a month in winter.
MAINTENANCE
Clivias are low maintenance and plants will benefit from being split every 4-5 years when they become crowded. Divide after flowering.
LANDSCAPING USES
Mass plant in well-composted soil under large trees or in large containers on a shady patio.
They also work well as indoor plants.
GARDEN THEMES
Forest, Formal, Tropical, Woodland
FOLIAGE
The leaves are dark green and strappy with slightly raised ridges which run along the length.
FRUIT
PESTS & DISEASES
Slugs, snails and the amaryllis lily borer caterpillar sometimes attack clivia. Slugs and snails can be controlled with a beer bait or by the local Hadeda population.
CAUTION
The berries contain a toxic substance which may be harmful to children if consumed.

8 Responses

  1. Hi Karrol

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The leaves of Clivia are variable and some do have ridges. You need not be concerned as long as your leaves are dark green and rigid.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. I have a small clivia given to me by a neighbor. I have had it for 3 mths and am keeping it on a table back from a west window. All the leaves have deep ridges and I wonder if that is normal…from what I see on line, the leaves are smooth. Do I have a problem? Thank you.

  3. Hi Christine

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Clivias can withstand cold of up to -3 degrees Celcius.

    As your climate is not the natural habitat for Clivias, you’d need to protect them from adverse conditions. When moving plants indoors for winter, it’s best to do so at the end of autumn.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  4. I live in Phoenix Arizona, should I bring my clivia inside during the winter? If so, when would you recommend that I do so.

  5. Thanks for tips about this amazing beautiful plant.
    I can now plant it in the right place.

  6. Hi Les

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Clivia foliage should never be cut back as the leaves help to manufacture food to the growing the bulb in preparation for the flowering season in spring. Cut leaves will never grow back and you’ll need to wait for the growth of new foliage to get the plant back to its true form.

    New leaves are formed from the centre of the crown, so you may find that the older leaves start drooping and going brown. To keep the plant tidy, these older leaves can be removed at the base.

    On an aesthetic note, the foliage provides colour to the bedding areas even if the plant isn’t in flower. (Yes, green is also a colour!)

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  7. I have them in my garden but didn’t know the name. Thanks for the information on when to split them.

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