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Dais cotinifolia

Common names: Pompon Tree (E); inTozane-emnyama (Z); Kannabas, Basboom (A); inTozane (X);

Native to: Southern Africa
Tree

Dais cotinifolia

DECIDUOUS

FULL SUN

SEMI-SHADE

FROST HARDY

MEDIUM WATER REQUIREMENTS

FAST GROWER

FRAGRANT

ATTRACTS BIRDS

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

6m x 5m
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D
FRUITING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Dais cotinifolia

DESCRIPTION

A small tree which forms a rounded crown of mildly glossy blue-green foliage. The grey-brown bark is often streaked. Masses of fragrant, pinkish-mauve flowers forming a pompon-like cluster grace this tree in the flowering season.

WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
The flowers attract butterflies and many other insects
WATER REQUIREMENTS
Water moderately in summer.
MAINTENANCE
Low maintenance. For best flowering results, feed with slow release 3:1:5 at 6 week intervals throughout the growing season.
LANDSCAPING USES
Attractive feature plant suitable for small gardens. Can be planted along driveways, on a boundary or in the centre of a lawn.
GARDEN THEMES
Bushveld, Country, Forest, Formal, Woodland
FOLIAGE
BARK
PESTS & DISEASES
Seldom attacked by pests.

100 Responses

  1. Hi Bridget

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The selection of a tree is a big one as it’s likely to outlive us and it’s best to select something that will not cause damage and need to be removed after a few years.
    I’d recommend you consult with a landscaper in order to access your space and to help you make an informed decision for your space.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. Hi Glenice,

    Thank you for an informative site. I am brand new to gardening and attempting to acquire as much knowledge and assistance as I can.

    I have recently removed some invasive desert aloes in my small garden. And currently investigating what trees would be best suited to plant in their space to provide screening, fill the gaps and beautify the space by adding a pop of colour to the succulents. I’ve got two Tree Aloes lining the front wall (bought the home with these already. I’m told they are halfway grown and may cause problems because they are extremely close to the boundary wall. But it’s way too late to transplant them elsewhere now)

    I came across the Pompon tree as a suggestion and I was wondering if it may work for my space? Thinking of planting it in the front next to one of the tree aloes.
    So I hope you’re able to kindly give me three quick tips to consider before committing to the Pompon
    – How far away from the wall should they be? Realistically I can probably put it about 1.5m away from the boundary walls. But that would bring it relatively close it’s nearest Tree Aloe – which is already at about 5-6mts in height from soil to top of the tree
    – Direct sunlight in this spot is until around 1/2PM
    – I live in a gated complex, so my yard is small.

    And if not the Pompon, would you be willing to suggest another species that can be suited for such restrictive space but that can provide light screening. I was trying to Google small trees that provide light screening but the world of trees is SO extensive! Wow!!!

    Thank you for time and advise

  3. Hi Shalendra

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It may be a carpenter bee that takes bits of leaves to close off their nests cavities. This is a natural phenomenon and doesn’t harm the plant so no need to spray it.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  4. Good day, thanks for all the great advice.

    Something is eating the leaves of my pom pom tree. I see roundish bites on the leaves. Would a general pesticide be suitable? When is the correct time to apply it, in the evening?

    Thanks

  5. Hi Mariaan

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It’s best not to interfere with a transplanted tree as roots will get damaged in the process. Your tree may just need some time to get established in its new location. If there are no visible signs of distress, I’d recommend leaving it for another season.

    The damaged tree may very well develop a bushy, shrub-like appearance in response to the stress of a harsh winter.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  6. Hi Glenice I transplanted one of my Pompon trees last year in May, but it is not growing.
    We have clay soil but I mixed it with Compost, riversand and bonemeal. The other ones that I planted is already 4 meters high and grow lovely. Can I move it again to another spot or will it die.
    I wil do a better mixture by taking out all the clay and mix topsoil, compost, riversand, rock power and bonemeal, or is it not going to help?

    2. One of my other Pompon trees nearly died in the Winter but new shoots are growing from the bottom of the stem and about 1 meter high. Is it correct if I”m saying then it is no longer a tree but a shrub.
    Thank you so much for your feedback!

  7. Hi Adriaan

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Curling and brown leaves may be a sign of mineral deficiencies. Perhaps add an organic fertiliser and compost to the soil around your plant and cover with a layer of organic mulch or groundcovers to help keep the soil moist. It may be worthwhile taking a sample of some leaf cuttings to your local nursery to assess as they may be able to advise further.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  8. Hi! I have a young pompon tree that I planted in September. The tree is already over a meter in height! But I noticed that the leaves have started to curl and are turning brown. I live in the Free State and we have had a lot of rain this summer, with not a lot of high temperatures, but it has been very hot the past week. I felt the ground around the tree it is was hard – thus needing watering. So, I just want to double check – is the problem of the leaves curling and turning brown due to not enough water?; secondly (and most importantly) will my tree survive?

  9. Hi Liezl

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    What a fantastic gesture and you’ve chosen a wonderful, fast-growing tree which will bring great pleasure for several generations.

    You’d need to use the size of the bio-urn to guide the size of seedling to grow. I’m assuming that you’d need to source a sapling approximately 20-30cm tall in a 4l container and transfer that to the urn mixing the ashes with the supplied planting medium. It may be best to plant the urn in a larger container which can support the tree for 2-3 years following which it is advisable to transfer it to the ground in order for it to thrive.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  10. Hi Sal

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Your tree is still young so you’d need to be patient and allow it to develop a crown.

    Avoid removing the lower branches for the first 3-4 years as these help nourish the tree.

    If you do need to trim the tree, it’s advisable to do so outside its active growing period which is April – August in South Africa.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  11. Can I grow a pompom tree through a bio-urn with human ashes? I am looking for small to medium tree options as a memorial / remembrance tree for my mom.

  12. Hi, I have a new plant just over a metre tall, will this beach out on it own or do I need to cut off the new growth on top.. at the moment it’s a single stem..also if I need to cut it when is the best season to do this? I’m in Sydney Australia..

  13. Hi Sue

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia prefers a well-drained soil and is susceptible to fungal infections if it is exposed to prolonged wet conditions.

    Could it be possible that your plant may be getting too much water or your soil is not draining easily? Check the moisture of your soil and adjust your watering if required.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  14. I recently acquired a young pom pom tree. I am concerned as all the flowers have died. Some branches are also hanging. I know with the transplant it has endured some stress but am worried it’s not going to bounce back. Should I be concerned or is this normal. I live in the western cape – garden route.

  15. Hi Izel

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia sheds its leaves in winter so that could be the reason for the browning leaves. New growth typically only starts in spring when the temperature warms up. Perhaps your tree lost its new leaves because of the cold weather (if you’re in South Africa). Ensure that you’re not over-watering as that can also cause yellowing leaves. Perhaps get a moisture meter to test your soil moisture level to prevent over-watering.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  16. I’ve planted a pompom tree about 1 year ago. The leaves keeps turning brown. I went to the nursery where I’ve purchased it. They gave me organic fertilizer and asked me to increase watering. Made a few new leaves about a week ago. Now they also turning brown and folding over like its shrinking.

  17. Hi Johann

    Thanks for visiting our site and your feedback.

    Dais cotinifolia will work in your climate.

    Also consider:-
    – Apodytes dimidiata (Wild pear)
    – Nuxia floribunda (Forest elder)
    – Brachylaena discolor (Coastal silver oak)

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  18. Hello Glenice
    I am impressed with the standard of advice given to people with inquiries! I hope you will be able give me some guidance.
    We are considering the pom-pom tree as a pavement tree all along the fence of our residential estate in George. I am comfortable that our climate meets the requirements for the trees to flourish. My concern is that we have clay soil. Will the pom-poms grow well if they are planted and cared for as prescribed?
    The other trees that we consider are: White stinkwood, white karee, water pear and water berry although we are a bit concerned about the aggressive roots of the stinkwood and water berry. None of them are, however, as pretty as the pom-pom (in my view).
    Your advice will be highly appreciated.
    Thanks

  19. Hi Retha

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia is a good choice.

    Other options could be:
    – Ilex Mitis (Cape holly)
    – Apodytes dimidiata (White pear)
    – Clausena anisata (Horsewood)
    – Diospyros whyteana (Bladdernut)

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  20. Looking for a smaller size ornamental tree in a smallmpatch next to a garden flat ( needs to have non.agressive roots and allow other plants round the base). We were thinking a Pom.pom tree.
    Would it survive in the Somerset West wind? Any other sugestions welcome.

  21. Hi Noelene

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Congratulations on becoming the new patron of a beautiful indigenous tree.

    You can plant it immediately unless you’re in an area that experiences heavy frost and the planting area is not protected, then it may be best to wait until spring.

    All the best with your new sapling.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  22. Hi Adele

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    As far as I’m aware, the pollen of Dais cotinifolia is not allergenic.

    Wind borne pollens tend to be the most allergenic. Some of the most allergenic plants in South Africa are grasses, cypress, oak and plane trees.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  23. Hi Glenice,
    I just want to find out if the tree’s flowers are prone to cause allergies and hayfever when in full bloom?
    Thanks

  24. Hi Glenice,

    I just want to find out if the Pom Pom tree is prone to cause allergies and hayfever when in bloom?

  25. Hi Dylan

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It seems like your plant experienced an unusual growth spurt, probably due to your excellent planting methods. The signs it is now displaying are typical of transplant shock and possibly over-watering but still fairly common for this species as it does tend to go dormant over winter. The tree is probably realising that the supply of wonderful nutrients and rich soil are not so readily available in the surrounding soil where the roots must spread. The wind could also be a factor.

    Ideally, you should reduce your watering to mimic what happens in nature. As this tree is naturally found in a summer rainfall areas, try reducing your watering to just once a month so that the tree can sustain itself.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  26. We planted a young Pompon in our garden about a year and a half ago, and it doubled in size in no time after planting (now around 3m tall). After 9 months or so of being planted its growth stopped, and its leaves became strangely shaped. They all seem to be curling and crumpled up, and are now a lighter green and with some blotchy yellow spots. We water the tree 1 – 2 times a week with borehole water (high iron content), and it is about 3m away from a pool. None of the other plants nearby have any issues – Hibiscus, Strelitzia, Cycad, Clivia, Bamboo palm. When planting we dug a 1m cube, and mixed in some compost, plant food, and bonemeal. There are no other trees nearby. We have very sandy soil and are in Cape town (windy spot). I do not see anything on or under the leaves, and the base seems clear of any insects or weeds. I am not sure what the problem is, and the tree seems to be dying (no leaves are being replaced, and no growth)

  27. Hi Nishkar

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Most trees generally fare better when planted in the ground as space and water conditions are not restricted.

    Many growers have confirmed that Dais cotinifolia is notoriously a fussy plant that generally doesn’t like restricted conditions. However, there are exceptions as I’ve seen one growing quite contently in a pot as a clipped standard.

    If you do want to give it a try, ensure that your pot is at least 1m wide and 1m tall.

    Flourish!
    Glencie

  28. Hi Ally

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, these new trees can be transplanted. Remember that the success of any transplant involves minimising the root disturbance. It’s best done outside an active growing period.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  29. Hi..I had a very old Pon Pon tree (35 years) which I had cut down….after a while it sent about 10 new shoots up which are now grouped and about 3 meters high each. Can one ‘transplant’ these ‘new trees’ to different spots in the garden with much success? I am in Bryanston JHB.
    Ally

  30. Hi Kerissa

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia tends to be sensitive when transferred from a planting bag to the soil as the conditions vary. Your plant was also initially grown under vastly different climatic conditions so has undergone further stress in adjusting to the conditions.

    Consider whether you may be over-watering – reduce your water application and monitor the tree for any change in 3-4 weeks. If possible, take a stem cutting to your local nursery and they may be able to assist you in saving the tree.

    If you do lose the tree, try to source another from a local nursery and don’t plant it in exactly the same location as sometimes fungal infections from the dead tree may infect a new one.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  31. Hi Glenice,

    I bought a Dais cotinifolia tree from the Kirstenbosche gardens in January this year. I live in Durban. I planted the little tree in a grass patch (full sun). All the leaves are turning brown (with holes within some of the brown spots), and no new shoots are growing since planting it in Jan. I have watered the plant and the soil is moist.

    Is there anything I can do to save the tree? What could be wrong?

    Thanks,
    Kerissa

  32. Hi Pearl

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Whilst deciduous trees don’t offer a solid screen, the network of branches still provides some screening. The benefit is that you get a lot more warmth and light in the winter months.

    Depending on your location, Dais cotinifolia may not lose all its leaves. It also sheds its foliage towards the end of winter for a very short period.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  33. Hi Glenice

    I have 3 variegated privet trees that get full afternoon sun, that I’d like to replace with indigenous trees.

    I’m thinking about Dais Cotinifolia, or Dombeya Rotundifolia, both deciduous – if I need screening is this a good idea?

    Any other suggestions would be most welcome.

    Thank you for valued information, always.

    Pearl Stillerman

  34. Hi Brenda

    Dais cotinifolia is a stunning tree and will grow in Cape Town. To the best of my knowledge, they do not attract worms.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  35. Hi Brenda

    Dais cotinifolia will grow in Cape Town. To the best of my knowledge, they do not attract worms.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  36. Good afternoon, do you know if the pompom tree will grow in Cape Town? I don’t mind insects but do you know if it attracts worms? Beautiful tree.

  37. Good afternoon, do you know if the pompom tree will grow in Cape Town? I don’t mind insects but do you know if it attracts worms? Beautiful tree?

  38. Hi Maryna

    Your tree may be a little too close to the wall. If it is small enough to still transplant, you may want to relocate it to no less than 3m from the wall.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  39. 18/10/2019

    Kan jy asb vir my raad gee , ek het my pom pom boom so 3 jaar terug geplant maar die stam begin nou na die muur se kant toe beweeg my man is net bang hy gaan die muur omdruk as hy groter raak, ek sal ook graag wil weet hoe lyk sy wortel stelsel en hoe dik word die wortels .

    Baie dankie
    Groete

  40. Hi Jolanda

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Your choice of trees are not toxic to animals.

    All the best with your planting.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  41. I would like to find out whether the following trees / shrubs are safe and non toxic to domesticated animal like rabbits
    I have a small raised area between the entrance staircase and the double storage balcony that is North facing and gets extremely hot during summers that I would like to plant medium sised trees that would be safe for animal ( the space is approx: width 3m and length 4m)

    I would like something that does not start to look untidy, and does not make a lot of mess, but also something that would attract wildlife and insects, evergreen if possible and also fast growing if possible otherwise I will just have to get a large specimen to plant

    I quite liked the following but I am not sure of the toxic nature of it , if you could please advice
    I live in the Western Cape

    Schotia afra – Karoo boer-bean – Karoo huilboerboon
    Bauhinia blakeana – Hong Kong Orchid tree
    Heteropyxis canescens – Forest lavender – Boslaventelboom
    Bauhinia galpinii – Pride of De Kaap – Vlam-van-die-Vlakte

  42. Hi Andrea

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia is generally problem-free. Without knowing your location, I don’t know whether your climate may have an influence.

    Other things to consider are the condition of your soil and watering routine.

    The trees are semi-deciduous, so could just be going through a process of shedding their leaves for winter. You’ll be able to access the situation better when the new spring growth appears. If there is still a problem, take a sample to your nearest nursery and they should be able to advise you.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  43. Hi Glenice,

    I planted my Pompom tree 3 months ago. It looked like it settled well, but now the leaves are kind of turning inwards downwards and have some dark / black marks on them.

    Any idea what is going on?

    Andrea

  44. Hi Maryna

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    You’ve ideal conditions for Dais cotinifolia and the late afternoon shade will not be an issue for the tree.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  45. Hello Glenice. I live in Boksburg in sa garden flat. I just love the Pom pom tree. My back garden is big enough for a pom pom tree but will get full afternoon shade from about 15:00. Will full morning and midday sun be enough for it? And also I would like to know if I could prune it later on to be able to put a small sitting area under it? Glad I found your site.
    Kind regards
    Maryna Carlse

  46. Hi Jim

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It’s always interesting to hear about the exotic locations in which our South African plants are being grown.

    It seems that you’ve given your trees all the right treatments and they may just be taking a little strain in adjusting to their new environment.
    Trees generally take a season or two to establish themselves. It may appear that there’s been no growth, but most of the growth happens underground with the roots developing a strong foundation to support the tree and supply it with nutrients.

    It is normal for Dais cotinifolia to go semi-dormant and lose some leaves in winter. It is also very common that trees of the same species react differently in the same environment, so don’t despair.

    Remember to apply a generous layer of an organic mulch around your trees for winter and I’m sure you’ll experience see some positive growth from spring.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  47. I planted three pom pom trees in my garden in Adelaide, South Australia last Spring. All three trees are planted in a raised garden bed. The first tree was very young and has grown remarkably well after a little early pruning to encourage a leader branch. The other two trees were several years old and were about 2.5metres tall when I planted them. Both of these trees produced flowers last summer just before Christmas. Neither of these trees have grown since flowering. One has green leaves and the other has leaves that are now yellow. We have had a hot summer and I have kept the water up to these two trees. I have put some iron, solid magnesium and seasol (seaweed extract to promote root growth) on both the larger trees. Can you recommend any further action that will help the two larger trees to show some growth? We are now approaching winter and the season has just changed with some good rainfall. I enjoy reading your advice from Adelaide.
    Jim

  48. Hi Carol

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It seems like your trees are not happy with the conditions where they are.

    Check the basic plant requirements:-
    – Soil – should be well-draining with compost applied at least every spring
    – Mulch protecting the soil
    – Moderate watering in summer
    – Light – do they receive at least 5 hours of direct sunlight per day?
    – Space – is there a structure close by which could be affecting the root development?

    If the situation still leaves you baffled, it would be best to consult with an arborist to assess the situation.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  49. Hi Glenice,
    We live in Irene, Centurion.
    I’ve 3 Pom Pom trees that are about 9 years old, all three seem to be dying. They are planted on the east side of our property along a short wall with roses between them. After the drought last summer they looked very unhappy. They did not get new green leaves. This summer there were very few leaves and only the odd flower. But they have produced a great number of suckers, they are popping up all over the flower bed and killing off the roses. When one is taken out more seem to pop up immediately.
    Please help, Regards , Carol

  50. Hi Marina

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia tends to be semi-deciduous in winter rainfall areas. There are many specimens growing successfully in Cape Town so the species can survive your conditions.

    For a fully indigenous tree, you may want to also consider:
    – Celtis africana (White stinkwood)
    – Vachellia karroo (Sweet thorn)
    – Searsia lancea (Karee)

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  51. Hello Glenice

    The detail published indicates the Pom Pom is deciduous or am I misunderstanding?
    I need a fully deciduous indigenous tree that will not block winter sun from the windows.
    We have a very small, narrow garden on the east and south side of the house, so it needs to go on the pavement on the east side to keep sun and heat off the windows in the spring/summer days.
    We are in Cape Town, so I presume the winter rains would become a challenge? We have the typical sandy soil, improved by compost and I hope that the drainage it provides will allow opportunity for Pom Poms to flourish and survive the wet winter conditions?

    So much appreciated

    Marina

  52. Hi Debbie

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Sorry to hear about your tree.

    I sounds like the ground around the tree is waterlogged and Dais cotinifolia prefer a well-drained soil. If this is the case, you may need to consider a drainage solution for the area to redirect the water and prevent excess water. Hopefully, the soil has dried out a bit with the recent hot days.

    Check your tree in a few weeks as it may recover from this shock.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  53. Good evening Glenice,

    I have 3 Dia continifolia’s the one has been in for 4 years . We have has lots of rain in Kempton Park. This morning I found this large tree with every leaf hanging. I am so upset. What could be wrong. It is a beautiful large tree.
    It has been so successful till now.

    Regards
    Debbie

  54. Hi Tharina

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia is not a messy tree, so shouldn’t bother your neighbours. It is a fantastic and fast-growing screening tree and should be planted at least 2m from any structure to avoid damage at a later stage.

    It will probably reach a height of 3m in a container. Ensure that your planter is at least 1m high and 1m wide to allow your tree ample space to develop a strong root system.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  55. I only have a 1m wide area next to my boundary wall where I need to plant a type of a screening tree. Would this tree work? Does it not causes a mess when losing flowers (some would be falling in the neighbor’s stand)?

    How tall would it grow in a container? Or if I plant it in the ground, can I trim it to about 2m wide?

  56. Hi Gail

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yellowing leaves has several causes and these are the common ones:
    – Nutrients lacking in your planting medium;
    – Too much fertiliser;
    – Under watering;
    – Over-watering (possibly soil that doesn’t drain easily);

    Perhaps try again with a 50:50 mix of quality compost and river sand.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  57. I’ve tried to grow Dais cotinifolia in different sized pots (buying them in 4″ pots originally) but even before planting in the ground, they develop yellow, sickly looking leaves and finally die. Seems to lack a mineral or nutrient. I can send a photo, but do you know any likely culprits? I believe they came with some fertilizer. (can send photo)

  58. Hi Roberta

    Yes, I remember you. Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Most trees seem to be out of sync in slightly different conditions. Your garden micro-climate may just mean that your tree will show its new spring foliage a little later than other trees. I’ve noticed that Dais cotinifolia is one of the indigenous species in which the shooting of new leaves and flowering periods can vary by up to 3 months.

    Around my home, there are 3 trees within 20m of each other. One has already started flowering this week; the second has flower buds and the third has just started producing new spring foliage. The late bloomer is in a slightly more shaded position than the rest.

    Be patient, and I’m sure your tree will perform. On the bright side, it should be in full bloom around Christmas for additional festive cheer!

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  59. Hi Glenice!!
    Remember me? You landscaped our garden in Rivonia in 2014.
    Our Pom-Pom tree has grown beautifully and is around 2 meters tall now. This spring it has not come back to life and has zero leaves on it. Just a bunch of sticks. When I scratch the bark, there is green underneath. What could the problem be and it the tree dying?
    Regards
    Roberta

  60. Hi Elize

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It sounds like your Dais cotinifolia could be taking a while to settle into its new home. This settling-in process depends of several factors like:
    – The size of the tree at the time of planting and currently;
    – The difference in growing environments – the conditions could vary dramatically at the nursery where it was grown and your home;
    – The planting position and procedure;
    – Your soil conditions.

    The fact that your tree is gaining height could be because there is competition for light from surrounding trees or structures and the tree is focusing its energy on growing tall and not producing flowers. Usually trees take about 2-3 years to adjust to a new environment, so perhaps this year, yours will produce its first flowers.

    The brown and curly leaves are quite common at the end of winter. Check to see if there is any new growth. Most Dais cotinifolia trees growing in Gauteng will have noticeable new leaf growth at this time of the year.

    I hope this has helped you.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  61. Good day,

    We reside in Centurion and planted a PomPom tree +/- 2 years ago. It has gained a lot of hight but hasn’t produced any flowers since, the leaves are a rusty brown and curly.

    What are we doing wrong?

    Thanking you in advance,
    Elize

  62. Hi Lynda

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    In Hilton (KZN), Dais cotinifolia can grow up to 10m tall.

    To be safe, ensure that it is at least 4m from any structures.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  63. I have a small garden in a complex in Hilton. I please need to know how big the tree grows and where is ithe best place to plant it?

  64. Hi Anais

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dais cotinifolia (Pompom tree) doesn’t fair well when restricted to a container.

    If you do try to grow it in a pot, you’ll need to select a very large one, at least 1.5m tall and wide to allow for a reasonable root system. The lifespan of your tree may not be as long as those grown in open ground because of the restricted space. The size will depend on the growing conditions and space available.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  65. Hi Caren

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    If you’re planting the trees in a row, you can space them further apart. The distance will depend on your space available, the desired goal and your budget.

    I imagine you’re trying to create an avenue with the tree canopies touching. Considering the average width that a full-grown tree can reach which is approximately 5m, I’d recommend spacing your trees between 3-6m apart.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  66. Hello Glenice

    I live in Phalaborwa, Limpopo and would like to plant a few of the Pompon trees in a row along a driveway/parking area. I read in one of your comments to plant a group of trees 1.5m apart, would that apply to planting the trees in a row as well? Or how far apart should I plant the trees?

    Thank you for a very informative website!

    Kind regards
    Caren

  67. Hi Karin

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    If you’re in a frost-free zone, then now is a good time to plant as the tree will have a couple of months to settle into its new home before the growing season begins.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  68. Good morning Glenice
    I live in the east of Pretoria -frost free. Will it be a good time to plant a tree now, or should i wait until August (Spring)?
    Thank you – what a wonderful website !

  69. Hi lee

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, the Dais cotinifolia should survive in your area. You may need to provide it with strong stakes for the first few years to provide some stability from strong winds.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  70. Hi Deon

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, a mini forest of Dais cotinifolia will work. By planting the trees in a triangular pattern, 1.5m apart, you should be able to fit them in your space.

    Chlorophytum saundersiae (Anthericum) will work wonderfully as a grass9like groundcover around them.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  71. Hi Glenice,

    Do you think I can plant a mini forest (3) of Dais continifolia in a corner of my garden or is there another tree that would work better (I have about 12m2 to work with close to a pool)? How far apart would you suggest I plant them and what ornamental grass would compliment it as a ground cover?

    Many thanks for your informative site!

    Regards
    Deon

  72. Hi Dawid

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    You can plant your tree in autumn. As an extra precaution, you should protect the trunk if your area typically experiences frost in winter.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  73. Hi,

    I would like to play the the pompom in a pot in our garden. With that in mind, does it then matter when you plant it e.g. now in Autumn our should it rather be left for spring?

    Dawid

  74. Hi Marietjie

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Although they are generally fast-growing trees, they can sometimes take longer to settle into a new environment before showing any significant growth. The fact that it has flowered is a good sign. Continue to apply compost around the planting area and protect the trunk with a frost protection fabric in winter. The tree should show signs of growth in spring.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  75. hallo. Ons bly nou in Secunda en het hierdie boompie in Januarie 2017 hier geplant, dit het wel geblom maar het min groeie getoon. Sal dit aard hier in Secunda , Mpumalanga?

  76. Hi Wade

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    You’ll battle to find this is a large size as most nurserymen say this species doesn’t do well in a container for that length of time. However, you may be lucky and find one of the large tree suppliers has one.

    All the best.
    Glenice

  77. Hi Glenice

    Would you be able to advise where in Pretoria we could purchase the Pompon Tree: 200L – 400L size?

    Much obliged.
    Wade

  78. Hi Neels

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, Dais cotinifolia can be propagated from cuttings. They should be 40-60mm long and 5-10mm in diameter. Treat them with a root-stimulating hormone and plant in a well-drained medium.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  79. Hi

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook and it’s great to hear that we’re assisting gardeners so far away.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  80. have this tree growing in a pot for past 4 yrs [ now 1.5m tall ] ,neva knew its name ,till i saw a pic of the flowers ..
    growing well in christchurch new zealand

  81. Hi Natasjha

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, the Dais cotinifolia can withstand frost. However, it is wise to protect young trees for the first two winters.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  82. Great site! Thank you! Will this tree tolerate frost? We live on a farm, in the winter we’ve had temperatures of about -6 ?

  83. Hi Lux

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, the Dais cotinifolia will work to provide shade to your cottage garden.

    The roots are not invasive, but it is recommended not to plant it less than 2m from any structures.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  84. Hi ,
    I need a medium tree for shade next to a cottage on my property which is in the sun morning to evening. Would the pom pom bush b an ideal small tree for shade and how invasive are the roots.
    Please let me know.
    Lux

  85. Hi Partha

    The Dais cotinifolia grows in a variety of locations in South Africa, including tropical areas.

    If you do manage to find it for sale in India, then that would be a good indication of its suitability for your climate.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  86. Hi Susan

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The life span of your tree will depend on its growing conditions. I’ve seen some specimens of Dais cotinifolia which are over 30 years old.

    In general, the faster growing species like Dais cotinifolia tend to have a shorter lifespan. But, it is relative to each individual situation.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  87. Hi Genevieve

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    There isn’t much information on the root depth of this species. However, as a guide, the root network can extend as deep as the height above ground which would be roughly 4-6 metres.

    I hope this helps.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  88. How deep a root system does the pompon have – what is the shallowest deep one could plant the trees at? Thank you!

  89. Hi Fozia

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The Pompon tree (Dais Cotinifolia)is naturally found in the eastern, summer rainfall areas of the country. So, although it’s not naturally found around Cape Town, it is hardy and may be able to tolerate Cape conditions. A very good indicator of its suitability is whether it is available from your local nursery.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  90. Hi Glenis,

    Am a truly thankful reader. Would the pompon tree grow in Cape Town.

    Many thanks, Fozia

  91. Hi Gert and Amanda

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    The flowers of Dais cotinifolia do not cause a mess at all. They dry on the plant and decompose fairly quickly when they fall off. I’ve never noticed piles of spent flowers that require a clean up.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  92. Ons hou van die eerste boom maar as die blomme afval is dit nie n gemors nie?
    Ek is nie seker of Pride of Indie n struik is of boom nie maar navors n bietjie.
    Dankie vir jou moeite
    Groete

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