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Dicliptera clinopodea

Common names: Pink Ribbons (E); Lintbos (A);

Native to: Southern Africa
Groundcover, Shrub
A hardy shrublet with dark green leaves bearing dense clusters of violet flowers during autumn and winter.

Dicliptera clinopodea

EVERGREEN

SEMI-SHADE

SHADE

SEMI FROST HARDY

FAST GROWER

FRAGRANT

ATTRACTS BIRDS

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

0.4m x 0.3m

MAXIMUM SIZE:

0.9m x 0.3m
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Dicliptera clinopodea

DESCRIPTION

A hardy, sprawling perennial shrub let that has a long flowering period, producing delicate, two lipped tubular flowers at intervals along its upright branches.

NATURAL HABITAT & DISTRIBUTION
Forest margins and along small streams.
WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
This shrub is regularly visited by butterflies and the hummingbird hawk moth who feed on the nectar. It serves as a larval host plant to three species of butterfly.
WATER REQUIREMENTS
Water moderately throughout the year.
MAINTENANCE
Low maintenance.
Prune back after flowering to encourage bushy growth and to keep the plant neat.
LANDSCAPING USES
A fantastic addition to provide some height to a mixed herbaceous border in semi-shade.
GARDEN THEMES
Country, Forest, Woodland
FLOWERS
FOLIAGE
BUTTERFLY/MOTH HOST PLANT
Junonia hierta (Yellow Pansy)
Junonia natalica (Brown Pansy)
Junonia oenone (Blue Pansy)
PESTS & DISEASES
Sometimes attacked by wooly aphids. Trim off affected stems and the plant will recover.

4 Responses

  1. Hi Konrad

    I don’ think anyone has studied the relationship between the Hummingbird hawk-moth and ribbon bush, however I’m sure the hummingbird hawk-moth feeds off any plant that flowers prolifically. In my garden, they alternate between the Freylinia tropica, hypoestes aristata and dicliptera clinopodea.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. Hi Konrad

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook and for your observations.

    The hummingbird hawk-moths are extremely tricky to photograph. You’ve also taught me something about the bees. I normally see carpenter bees around the Dicliptera clinopodea. Please send us some of your photographs. Would you mind if you include some on our website?

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  3. Hi Glenis,
    hereabouts I have the opportunity of observing the insect life on more than a hundred of these shrubs.
    Apart from various solitary bee species and some hover-flies the major visitors to the flowers are honeybees and hummingbird hawk-moths; the latter being the busier ones.
    The moths pay a fleeting visit to the blossoms. Therefore, its ‘quite difficult to take good photos of them. With the bees it’s different. A bee’s tongue is far too short to get to the nectar at the bottom of the corolla. They get to it by tearing the blossoms open at the lower end of the tube and lap up the nectar.

    I’ll send some Photos.

    Regards,
    Konrad

  4. Hi Glenis,
    I’d been searching for information regarding the relationship between the Ribbon Bush and the Hummingbird Hawk-Moth, when this spot of yours came to light. I am pleased to see that at least for one species of the Acanthaceae-family recognition is given to this moth’s relationship to these plants.
    More about it under Hypoestes aristata.

    Regards,
    Konrad

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