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Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia

Common names: Sand Olive (E); Sandolien (A);

Native to: Southern Africa
Shrub, Tree

Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia

EVERGREEN

FULL SUN

FROST HARDY

LOW WATER REQUIREMENTS

FAST GROWER

ATTRACTS BIRDS

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

5m x 4m
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D
FRUITING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia

DESCRIPTION

This fast-growing, drought-resistant shrub makes a good hedge or screening plant. Its bark is dark grey and its drooping leaves are shiny and covered in a resinous substance. It bears small yellow flowers which are followed by decorative clusters of singed greenis-red fruits.

WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
This plant is used extensively to control soil erosion.
WATER REQUIREMENTS
Water moderately.
MAINTENANCE
Low maintenance.
LANDSCAPING USES
Useful to stabilise sand dunes and to control erosion. An excellent screening plant or windbreak.
FOLIAGE
BARK
PESTS & DISEASES
Seldom attacked by pests and diseases.

24 Responses

  1. Hi Morne

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    You’ll need to remove lower branches as the plant grows and that will encourage it to grow into a tree-like form.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. Hi. I would like to plant the Sand Olive in the West Coast an nature it to become free sanding tree and not a hedge. Any advice?
    Thnks
    Morne

  3. Hi Martin

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Depending on your growing conditions, you can expect 0.5-0.9m growth per year from Dodonaea angustifolia.

    Flourish!
    Glenoice

  4. Hi Theresa

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    As far as I’m aware, Dodonaea angustifolia doesn’t have any gum so this is most probably coming be from another tree.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  5. Hi Rina

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dodonaea angustifolia can be planted 70-100cm apart, depending on your desired height and growing conditions.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  6. Hi Nita

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It sounds like your tree may be exposed to wind that is affecting the taller branches.

    Check your conditions and perhaps provide a windbreak to protect your tree.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  7. Hi
    I have a purple sand olive in Stilbaai which has grown beautifully ( tree) but suddenly seems to be showing die back on the growing points of branches. It is flowering flower down branches. Can you advise please?

  8. Hi Tracyjane

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Sand olives do not usually have an aggressive root system. However, to be safe, do not plant the tree less than 1.5m from your structure.

    Ballito has a favourable climate to grow many species and your choice will fare well.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  9. I would like to plant Sand Olives in our garden next to a large man made pond. What are the roots like in this tree? and will it grow well in Ballito Natal ?

  10. Hi Sally

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Your sand olives (Dodonaea angustifolia) should be relatively easy to transplant:
    – Water the plants deeply before the transplant.
    – Prepare your planting holes with compost and an organic fertiliser.
    – Dig out as much of the root ball as possible – at least 40cm around the trunk and about 50cm deep.
    – Plant in the new location and water deeply, daily for at least 6 weeks.

    Flourish!
    Glenice
    – Trans

  11. I have some sand olives growing in my garden – grew from seed as I did not plant them. They are approximately one meter tall. I would like to transplant them in a different area of my garden. Would this be possible? If so, what sort of soil preparation should I do? I live in Tulbagh.
    Thank you
    Sally

  12. Hi Christine

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dodonea angustifolia often has the tendency to grow a network of roots near the soil surface which stabilise the plant. But, as the tree remains fairly small, the root system does not classify as invasive.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  13. Please can you advise if the root system is very invasive. I am growing 5 shrubs into a screening shrub in a very small garden in Cape Town, Milnerton area.

  14. Hi Hanle

    Thanks for your feedback.

    Please keep visiting and let us know if there’s anything we add to enhance the site.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  15. I want to thank you for this valuable resource. I came across it a few years ago when I decided to turn my garden mostly indigenous. I planted about 8 of the trees on your list and whilst they are too young to flower, they give me immense pleasure already. Thank you so much for compiling the list and being prepared to still advise people. I refer others to your list all the time.

  16. Hi Mitch

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Propagation of Dodonaea angustifolia is most reliable from seed. However, cuttings may also work. You’d need to experiment with several hardwood cuttings or semi-hardwood cuttings taken in autumn. The use of a rooting hormone will increase your changes of success.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  17. It’s it possible to grow Dodonaea from cuttings (or truncheons)? No available info on this on any of the sites I have visited.

  18. Hi Gail

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Dodonea angustifolia (Sand olive) prefers sandy soil. However, it is a fairly hardy plant that may be able to adjust to clay soil conditions. When planting, consider adding some river sand to your planting hole to assist with the drainage.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  19. Hi Sheilagh

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yes, the sand olive makes a stunning hedge. In fact, lovely specimens can been seen around cattle kraals in rural villages.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

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