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Plectranthus ‘Mona lavender’

Family: Lamiaceae (Mint family)

Common names: Mona Lavender (E);

Native to: Southern Africa
Groundcover, Shrub

Plectranthus ‘Mona lavender’

EVERGREEN

SEMI-SHADE

SHADE

SEMI FROST HARDY

MEDIUM WATER REQUIREMENTS

FAST GROWER

ATTRACTS INSECTS

FLOWER COLOUR:

AVERAGE SIZE:

0.4m x 0.5m
FLOWERING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Plectranthus ‘Mona lavender’

DESCRIPTION

An attractive, fast-growing hybridised herbaceous perennial shrub.  It has lush, dark green leaves that are a deep purple underneath, giving the plant a mystical appearance when blowing in a light breeze.  It bears long-lasting sprays of purple flowers from early spring throughout summer.

This shrub attracts a host of small insects, making it a wonderful addition to the wildlife-friendly forest garden.

WILDLIFE & ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS
Attracts insects and butterflies.
WATER REQUIREMENTS
It can be a little thirsty in dry weather, so water moderately.
MAINTENANCE
Low maintenance.
Keep the plant moist and continue adding leaf litter to simulate a natural forest environment.
The plants enjoy being pinched back after flowering to induce better branching and compactness.
LANDSCAPING USES
Suitable for shady positions underneath trees.
GARDEN THEMES
Country, Forest, Rockery, Woodland
FOLIAGE
PESTS & DISEASES
Seldom attacked by pests and diseases.
CULTIVATION
Propagate from cuttings.

7 Responses

  1. Hi Ilse

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    It sounds like your soil is not retaining water or the tree under which your Mona lavender is planted is very thirsty. Try adding extra compost and a few handfuls of perlite to your soil as this may help.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. My mona lavender seems to be “dry” although I water it often and it is in partial shade. Please advice.

  3. Hi Gail

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Fungal growth on potted plants is very tricky to deal with and fungal growth often persists in the planting medium after a plant has been treated.

    I would recommend repotting your plant with new potting mix and avoid over-watering.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  4. I have a Plectranthus in a flower pot in the garden and notice that often a white fungus appears. Spraying with soapy water seems to get rid of the fungus for a while but recently I have added some fresh garlic to the soapy water hoping it will keep the fungus away. What are your thoughts about my home remedy?

  5. Hi Noeline

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Before taking any drastic measures with the worms, please realise that Plectranthus species serve as host plants to several butterfly and moth species.

    This means that for a few days of the year you’ll have caterpillars feeding on your plants. This is a symbiotic relationship in nature and the plants will not be killed. In fact, they tend to grow back quite vigourously after the caterpillars have pupated. In a few weeks you’ll have some beautiful butterflies or moths serving as pollinators for some other plants in your area and contributing towards a balanced ecosystem.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  6. Sad to say that I discoverd 2 ugly green worms, with yellow stripes down the sides, chomping away on my beautiful Mona! Any advice?

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