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Podocarpus henkelii

Common names: Henkel’s Yellowwood (E); umSonti (Z); Henkel-se-geelhout (A);

Native to: Southern Africa
Tree

Podocarpus henkelii

EVERGREEN

FULL SUN

FROST HARDY

MEDIUM WATER REQUIREMENTS

SLOW GROWER

ATTRACTS BIRDS

ATTRACTS INSECTS

AVERAGE SIZE:

15m x 12m
FRUITING TIME:
J F M A M J J A S O N D

Podocarpus henkelii

DESCRIPTION

A large evergreen tree with a dense crown of drooping glossy dark green foliage. The bark is yellowish-grey and peels in long, narrow strips. The leaves are long (up to 17cm) and narrow. It bears large male cones and the female cones remain green.

WATER REQUIREMENTS
Water moderately throughout the year until well established.
MAINTENANCE
The yellowwood is low maintenance.
LANDSCAPING USES
A wonderful ornamental tree for a large garden.
GARDEN THEMES
Forest, Woodland
FOLIAGE
BARK
PESTS & DISEASES
Seldom attacked by pests and diseases.

12 Responses

  1. Hi Mary

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Yellowing leaves can be a sign of under-watering. But, this can also be a result of over-watering, poor light conditions, nutrient deficiency or infection.

    It may be best to get an arborist to inspect the tree and suggest suitable remedies to save the tree.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  2. Hi , our yellowwood has suddenly started getting dead branches about a third of the way up. It is in a complex and is watered weekly. It is next to another one and is about 25 ft in height. The branches seem to be dying from the middle outwards. There don’t seem to be any holes or bugs on the bark. Really don’t want to lose it. It has been drier since Jan heavy rain. Does it need more water.thank you. Mary

  3. Hi Tony

    Thanks for your comment.

    The Podocarpus henkelii is one of the many species which has confirmed infestations of the Polyphagous Shot Hole Borer (PSHB). It will be sad to lose your tree, so I’d advise you to contact one of the specialists listed on the Pan African Farms website who will be able to inspect and possibly diagnose and treat your tree.

    All the best.
    Flourish!
    Glenice

  4. Hi,
    With regards Christa’s question the same has happened to my one. I planted it as a sapling in 2004 and it has been fine and grown well until now. I see the same issue on some podacarpus outside my works office building. Sorry no solution but just note seems to be general. Home is Pretoria, work Jhb.

  5. Hi Christa

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Without seeing your tree, it is difficult to diagnose the issue.

    I recommend you contact an arborist who may be able to detect the cause. They should also be able to trim the dying branches and possibly treat it with a specialist nutrient booster.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  6. Several unconnected branches of my 6m-high tree are dying, from the bottom to right at the top. The tree was planted long before we bought the house and we’ve been here 9 years. I don’t see signs of a borer, and I’ve given it extra nutrients. I’m worried it’s dying. Could it be aphids? I had lots last year. Anything else I can do? I am in Sandton. Thanks.

  7. Hi Hester

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Without seeing the plant, it is a little difficult to pinpoint exactly what is happening.

    Your location would also be beneficial, but here are a few points that may help you to identify the cause, and possibly rectify the situation for your battling tree.

    Podocarpus henkelii is naturally found in a moist forest environment around the eastern coastal areas. It prefers well-drained soil. Check that your soil is well-drained and that your watering schedule allows for the soil to drain adequately. It is best to water for longer periods, less frequently as this allows the water to penetrate deeper into the soil where your tree roots will get the water.

    I don’t think your clivias are robbing the tree of nutrients, but it may be worthwhile adding compost and mulch to the soil to boost the nutrient content.

    Depending on your soil, your established flower bed should be able to withstand long periods without any watering. Perhaps try to cut the watering in that area for 3-4 weeks and see if that makes a difference to your tree. If not, you may need to consult with an arborist to determine the course of action to avoid losing your tree.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  8. Good day
    I have a henkeli plant inside a flowerbed with Clivia’s underneath. The tree’s leaves are turning brown at different
    places. Can it be that the flowers are taking too much nutrients from the soil, or because of too much watering?

    I also lost a very big fully grown Henkeli a few years back. It was planted on it’s own on the lawn. One winter night there was a very strong and cold wind blowing, it looked like the tree caught that icy wind whirling around it. It was only after a few weeks passed, that I realized the tree is becoming more and more dried out, hench it died overall. After the tree were chopped down, I found a strange appearance at the very top spriggs and leaves. It looked like it was going through a press, totally flattened. This was very sad but I never enquired about this phenomenon before. I would appreiate it if you can help in any way about this.
    Regards
    Hester de klerk

  9. Hi Edgar

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    If it’s just the older leaves, then there may be nothing to worry about as your tree is probably just shedding some foliage to make way for new growth.

    If all the leaves are turning yellow, then you may have a nutrient deficiency. In this case, I’d recommend an application of an organic fertiliser along with a generous portion of compost.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

  10. Why does the older leaves of my podocarpus henkelli turn yellow? It is a male tree. The leaves start to turn yellow from the base of the leave towards the tip of the leave.

  11. Hi Joanne

    Thanks for visiting Plantbook.

    Podocarpus henkelii is one of the larger yellowwoods and can have a spread of 10 metres. The growth will depend on your specific conditions, but I would recommend a distance of not less than 5 metres so that you can give it space to grow to its full potential and be able to admire this amazing species.

    Flourish!
    Glenice

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